Skills for innovation

Policy Profiles

Strengthening education and skills for innovation

Education policies play a central role in innovation, by supplying the foundations and skills innovative economies require to develop new processes, to adopt new products and to adapt to changes over time. Rising investment in intangible assets (i.e. software, designs, new forms of business organisation) has proved to be important for growth and productivity, and such intangible assets are... Read more...

Research careers

Research activities are dependent not only on funding and a prior accumulation of tangible and intangible assets (i.e. technology, software, patented knowledge etc.) but also on the pool of researchers and other highly skilled professionals available. Researchers are “professionals engaged in the conception and creation of new knowledge. Read more...

Labour market policies for the highly skilled

The effective use of a skilled workforce is necessary for a well-functioning science, technology and innovation (STI) system. The policy challenges in ensuring an adequate mix of skills for innovation are likely to vary by country. First, the range of skills for innovation ranges from S&T capabilities to skills such as management, communication and entrepreneurship. Second, the type of skills required varies widely across industries and firm size. Read more...

Building a science and innovation culture

Innovation requires developing and mobilising a broad range of skills throughout the workplace and society (Hanel, 2005; OECD, 2010; Toner, 2011). Considering the complex nature of the work required for innovation, desirable “skills” of individual and groups might be best understood as “capabilities” -- including the ability to synthesise relevant knowledge (from theoretical to practical expertise and know-how) and to think creatively -- and... Read more...