Workshop: "Towards effective science-industry co-creation"

 

5 December 2018

Paris, OECD Conference Center

 

Shortcut URL: www.innovationpolicyplatform.org/co-creation 

In recent years, we have seen a change in the interaction between science and industry from a primary focus on the transfer of research results from the lab into corporate R&D and product development, i.e. the traditional linear model of technology transfer, to an increased focus on different forms of interaction where industry and scientists work together with the goals of co-creating new knowledge and technologies. Science-industry co-creation that pushes the boundaries of traditional science-industry interaction (such as the well-established formats of contract research or sponsored research) has increasingly become a priority for policy makers as a vehicle for productivity growth and as a way to address various societal challenges. 

Recent examples of such science-industry co-creation comprise the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab, The TIM Open Labs by Telecom Italia, Portugal’s strategic program for collaborative laboratories (CoLab), AstraZeneca’s open innovation platform, and the MindSphere Innovation Network that Siemens launched recently with universities, to mention a few.  

Civil society is also more involved than ever in science-industry co-creation, particularly when it comes to addressing important societal challenges to find new solutions in the areas of health, sustainable growth and development to name but three areas. A recent example is UNLEASH.org where universities and companies work together to find solutions to UN Sustainable Development Goals.

But such science-industry co-creation is challenging current practices and principles for science-industry interaction in areas such as the management of intellectual property rights and governance. Success also depends on increasing mobility of individuals across organisational boundaries and incentives for different actors of the innovation eco-system. 

This workshop, organised jointly by the Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy (TIP) and the MIT Innovation Initiative, explored the emerging practices of science-industry co-creation and, against this background, explore the question: what are the policy principles and practices of effective science-industry co-creation? The workshop is organised in the context of, and contributes to, the TIP “Assessing the Impacts of Knowledge Transfer and Policy” project and to future planned TIP work on this topic. 

 

Agenda and speakers' biographies (PDF)

 

Preliminary takeaways from the workshop

Objectives of the workshop

 

  • Collect insights from university, industry, and civil society on the current state of science‑industry co-creation and the challenges involved
  • Discuss current policy initiatives on how to solve the challenges arising in co-creation between science, industry, and civil society
  • Discuss what policy changes or policy adaptation is needed to enable more effective co-creation for productivity growth and to address societal challenges  

The workshop will result in a policy paper written and published by the OECD and MIT on the “Practices and Principles for Co-creation between science and industry”. 

Agenda

9h30 – 9h45 : Opening and introduction to the workshop

  • Dirk Pilat, Deputy Director, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation
  • Fiona Murray, Associate Dean of Innovation at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and Co-director of MIT’s Innovation Initiative

9h45 – 10h15: Presentation of the pre-workshop report on the principles for effective science-industry co-creation

  • Lars Frølund, Visiting Fellow at MIT and Research Director of MIT Innovation Initiative
  • Caroline Paunov, Senior Economist and Head of Secretariat for the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

10h15 – 10h45: Keynote address by Fiona Murray on “Co-Creation at MIT”

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10h45 – 11h15: Coffee break

11h15 – 12h30: Panel 1 - Exploring university perspectives on co-creation

Questions addressed by the panel:

  • In what ways can co-creation be an effective way to produce breakthrough innovations and solve societal challenges? 
  • What key challenges should be addressed to achieve effective science-industry co creation? 
  • How should ownership of co-created knowledge be handled from the perspective of serving public and private interest? How should civil society best be involved in collaborations?
  • How can human talent be effectively circulated across organisational boundaries to ensure effective co-creation?

 

Chair: 

  • Göran Marklund, Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development at VINNOVA, and Chair of the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy.

Speakers: 

  • Adriënne Heijnen, Senior Research Policy Advisor, Aarhus University [videoconference]
  • Cathie Vix-Guterl, Vice  President R&D Strategic Anticipation Corporate, TOTAL
  • Kazuyuki Motohashi, Professor, Department of Technology Management for Innovation (TMI) School of Engineering, the University of Tokyo
  • Valeria D'amico, Head of Joint Open Lab Catania, Telecom Italia 

12h30 - 14h00: Lunch break

14h00 – 15h00: Panel 2 - Exploring the private sector and civil society perspective to co-creation

Questions addressed by the panel:

  • In what ways can co-creation be an effective way to produce breakthrough innovations / solve societal challenges? 
  • What key challenges should be addressed to achieve effective science-industry co creation? 
  • How should ownership of co-created knowledge be handled from the perspective of serving public and private interest? How should civil society best be involved in collaborations?
  • How can human talent be effectively circulated across organisational boundaries to ensure effective co-creation?

 

Chair:

  • Göran Marklund, Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development at VINNOVA, and Chair of the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy.

Speakers

  • Michael Sundström, Scientific Director, Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), [videoconference]
  • Harley Davis, Vice President from the France Lab, IBM
  • Oihana Basilio, Director of research and online programs, Fundación Rafael del Pino
  • Yves Bernaert, Lead for Accenture Technology in Europe and Intelligent Platform Services Business Performance

15h00 – 16h30: Breakout session - Principles for effective science-industry co-creation

The breakout groups will reflect on what are the key principles of effective science-industry co-creation and what are the implications for policy.  

16h30 – 17h00: Coffee break

17h00 - 18h00: Policy roundtable - Lessons learnt and next steps

The panel and workshop participants reflected on take-aways from the workshop, discussed policies and presented examples of policies implemented in different countries to support co-creation. They also pointed to next steps for policy analysis to support more effective co-creation. 

 

Chair:

  • Göran Marklund, Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development at VINNOVA, and Chair of the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy.

Speakers:

  • Mu Rongping, Director-General and Professor, Center for Innovation and Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Darja Isaksson, Director General, VINNOVA
  • Richard Johnson, CEO of Global Helix LLC and member of the Board on Life Sciences at the National Academy of Sciences, USA
  • Joerg Niehoff, Head of Sector Joint Programming, DG Research and Innovation,  European Commission  

18h00 - 18h15: Closing remarks

  • Dominique Guellec, Head of the Science and Technology Policy Division, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Practical information

OECD Headquarters

2 Rue André Pascal, 75016 Paris

 

The OECD website provides practical information about how to get to the OECD Conference Centre where the event will be held. 

Contact

Caroline Paunov (Caroline.Paunov@oecd.org) 

Content Visibility

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