Workshop: "Towards effective science-industry co-creation"

 

5 December 2018

Paris, OECD Conference Center

 

Shortcut URL: www.innovationpolicyplatform.org/co-creation

 

Introduction

In recent years, we have seen a change in the interaction between science and industry from a primary focus on the transfer of research results from the lab into corporate R&D and product development, i.e. the traditional linear model of technology transfer, to an increased focus on different forms of interaction where industry and scientists work together with the goals of co-creating new knowledge and technologies. Science-industry co-creation that pushes the boundaries of traditional science-industry interaction (such as the well-established formats of contract research or sponsored research) has increasingly become a priority for policy makers as a vehicle for productivity growth and as a way to address various societal challenges. 

Recent examples of such science-industry co-creation comprise the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab, The TIM Open Labs by Telecom Italia, Portugal’s strategic program for collaborative laboratories (CoLab), AstraZeneca’s open innovation platform, and the MindSphere Innovation Network that Siemens launched recently with universities, to mention a few.  

Civil society is also more involved than ever in science-industry co-creation, particularly when it comes to addressing important societal challenges to find new solutions in the areas of health, sustainable growth and development to name but three areas. A recent example is UNLEASH.org where universities and companies work together to find solutions to UN Sustainable Development Goals.

But such science-industry co-creation is challenging current practices and principles for science-industry interaction in areas such as the management of intellectual property rights and governance. Success also depends on increasing mobility of individuals across organisational boundaries and incentives for different actors of the innovation eco-system. 

The proposed joint workshop organised by the Working Party on Technological and Innovation Policy (TIP) and the MIT Lab for Innovation Science and Policy, MIT Innovation Initiative, will explore the emerging practices of science-industry co-creation and, against this background explore the question: what are the policy principles and practices of effective science-industry co-creation? The workshop is organised in the context of, and contributes to, the TIP “Assessing the Impacts of Knowledge Transfer and Policy” project and to future planned TIP work on this topic. 

Objectives of the workshop

 

This workshop aims to:

  • Collect insights from university, industry, and civil society on the current state of science‑industry co-creation and the challenges involved
  • Discuss current policy initiatives on how to solve the challenges arising in co-creation between science, industry, and civil society
  • Develop recommendations for policy changes or policy adaptation to enable more effective co-creation for productivity growth and to address societal challenges  

The workshop will result in a policy paper written and published by the OECD and MIT on the “Practices and Principles for Co-creation between science and industry”. A short pre-workshop report that outlines the current challenges for effective science-industry co-creation will be sent to the participants prior to the event. The report will be presented in the introduction of the workshop and will form the basis for the afternoon’s breakout discussions and policy panels. The outcomes of the workshop discussions will be used to draft the policy paper. 

Draft agenda

9h30 – 9h45 : Opening and introduction to the workshop

9h45 – 10h15: Presentation of the pre-workshop report on the principles for effective science-industry co-creation

  • Lars Frølund, MIT & Caroline Paunov, OECD

10h15 – 11h30: Panel 1 - Exploring University Perspectives on Co-Creation

Questions to be addressed by the panel:

  • In what ways can co-creation be an effective way to produce breakthrough innovations and solve societal challenges? 
  • What key challenges should be addressed to achieve effective science-industry co creation? 
  • How should ownership of co-created knowledge be handled from the perspective of serving public and private interest? How should civil society best be involved in collaborations?
  • How can human talent be effectively circulated across organisational boundaries to ensure effective co-creation?

11h30 – 12h00: Coffee break

12h00 – 13h00: Panel 2 - A Conversation Exploring the Private Sector and Civil Society Perspective to Co-Creation

Questions to be addressed by the panel:

  • In what ways can co-creation be an effective way to produce breakthrough innovations / solve societal challenges? 
  • What key challenges should be addressed to achieve effective science-industry co creation? 
  • How should ownership of co-created knowledge be handled from the perspective of serving public and private interest? How should civil society best be involved in collaborations?
  • How can human talent be effectively circulated across organizational boundaries to ensure effective co-creation?
  • How can human talent be effectively circulated across organisational boundaries to ensure co-creation? 

13h00 - 14h30: Lunch break

14h30 – 15h00: Keynote Address by Fiona Murray on “Co-Creation at MIT”

15h15 – 16h15: Breakout session - Principles for effective science-industry co-creation

The breakout groups will take stock of the panel discussions and reflect on the key question of the workshop: “what are the key principles of effective science-industry co-creation? The starting point for the discussion will be the pre-workshop document. 

16h15 – 16h45: Coffee break

16h45 – 17h30: Keynote address (tbc)

17h30 - 18h30: Panel 3 - Lessons learnt and next steps

The panel will report on the results of the breakout sessions and reflect on the lessons learnt and the next steps towards effective co-creation. It will be a roundtable discussion of policy makers.

Practical information

OECD Headquarters

2 Rue André Pascal, 75016 Paris

The OECD website provides practical information about how to get to the OECD Conference Centre where the event will be held.  

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